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Concord's Colonial Inn

Ghost Stories: 
    Concord's Colonial Inn
 in ConcordGhost Stories: 
    Concord's Colonial Inn
 in Concord

The Ghosts of Concord’s Colonial Inn

Welcome to Concord’s Colonial Inn, one of the oldest hotels in the United States! The original part of the building was built in 1716, a few years before the Revolutionary War. The North Bridge, just half a mile from the Inn, is where the “shot heard ‘round the world” took place on April 19, 1775 – beginning the Battle of Lexington and Concord and ultimately, the Revolutionary War. Many wounded patriot soldiers were taken to the Inn, which served as a hospital during the war. Due to the hotel’s age and role in the Revolutionary War, the Inn has been rumored to have a few resident ghosts!

Our most famous, haunted and sought-after guestroom is Room 24. During the Revolutionary War, a portion of the inn was owned by Dr. Timothy Minot. When patriot soldiers were injured at the Battle of Lexington and Concord at the North Bridge, they were brought to his home for treatment. Dr. Minot used what is now the Liberty Room as a hospital and Room 24 was his operating room. Several soldiers who were operated on in Room 24 unfortunately passed away during surgery. The deceased were carried directly downstairs into Room 27, which was used as a morgue.

Many guests who’ve spent the night in the infamously haunted room have reported some strange activity. One of the first reported sightings of something paranormal was documented in a letter from Mrs. Judith Fellenz to former innkeeper, Loring Grimes, after they had celebrated their wedding night in June 1966. Mrs. Fellenz wrote that she had awoken in the middle of the night and seen a “grayish figure” at the side of her bed. She wrote “it was not a distinct person, but a shadowy mass in the shape of a standing figure. It remained still for a moment, then slowly floated to the foot of the bed, in front of the fireplace.” Mr. Grimes replied that the spirit could have been that of "Dr. Minot, merely making his rounds” or Ralph Waldo Emerson “trying to sum up the courage to give a newlywed advice on achieving a good marriage.”

Other guests have reported lights flickering in the room or turning on and off completely on their own. One guest woke up in the middle of the night and every light was on in the room, as well as the television! Guests hear hushed whispers coming from the closet and have seen the door to the room slam shut on its own. Some courageous guests have even used their own “ghost-hunting” devices, such as voice recorders and cameras, to catch some evidence of supernatural visitors. Various guests have captured floating orbs in the room and voices from the past. A few guests have felt someone gently tucking them into bed. Apparitions of both a middle aged woman, supposedly a nurse named Rosemary, and wounded soldiers have appeared in the room, only to disappear moments later.

Thrill-seekers travel from all over to stay in the infamous Room 24, hoping to catch a glimpse of some supernatural activity. But the inn's resident spirits do not just confine themselves to Room 24; they like to wander the halls of the Colonial Inn just as much as guests do! Both an older woman and a tall, slim gentleman with a top hat have been spotted in the sitting room - perhaps it is Thoreau himself or his aunts looking to entertain some company? A young girl wearing a bonnet has been seen walking around by the front desk of the hotel. Both guests and employees have spotted spirits in colonial attire sitting in an otherwise empty Liberty Room. Things fall off of shelves and items go missing without a trace for weeks, only to turn up in the strangest places. Both guests and employees have heard voices coming from right behind them – only to see nothing when they turn around.


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