Hanover Inn Dartmouth

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Discover Hanover Inn Dartmouth, which is Part of the Dartmouth College campus, and is located on the site of an inn dating back to 1780.

Hanover Inn Dartmouth was constructed during the American Revolution, in which the thirteen American Colonies fought for their freedom from Great Britain.

Part of the Dartmouth College campus, the newly renovated Hanover Inn, site of an inn since 1780, blends rich history and 21st-century conveniences and amenities in a AAA Four Diamond, 108-room boutique hotel. At the Hanover Inn, guests enjoy an authentic sense of place embodied in the locally-sourced menu, the Dartmouth alumni memorabilia, original art from the adjacent Hood Museum, New Hampshire furnishings in the guestrooms and the 2,800-pound, handcrafted granite table and fireplace surrounds that are the dramatic focal points of the lobby.

Like an intricately woven tapestry, the history of the Hanover Inn reflects the growth and change experienced by the College itself. Eleven years after Dartmouth was founded in 1769 via a charter granted by King George III, General Ebenezer Brewster arrived in Hanover to accept a position as the College steward. His home occupied the present site of the Inn. An enterprising Connecticut Yankee, General Brewster redesigned his home in 1780 and converted it into a tavern. One historian notes that his new enterprise was ""not altogether, it would seem, to the gratification of the College authorities."" However, business flourished, and in 1813, General Brewster's son, Amos, had the tavern moved to another site and initiated construction of a much larger building, which he accomplished by first inducing his father to take an extended trip.

The larger structure became known as the Dartmouth Hotel, and it housed both permanent residents and transients. Professor Edwin J. Bartlett vividly recalled in a Dartmouth Book of Remembrance his two-year stay at a cost of six dollars per week, including meals: ""One would almost conclude that it was planned, furnished, and managed to drive its guests to homes of their own."" One old settler echoed the professor's opinion when, in 1887, the hotel burned to the ground, saying: ""God finally visited his wrath upon this architectural conglomeration by burning it down.""

Two years later, the Wheelock Hotel was erected, and in 1901 the College began an extensive two-year reconstruction and remodeling of the facility. Upon its completion, the new building was named the Hanover Inn. Since that time, the history of the Inn has been one of continual growth and expansion. In 1924, an east wing was added, providing an additional 48 guestrooms for a total of 92. Exterior expansion, including an outdoor dining terrace and landscaping, was initiated in 1939. Before Dartmouth College became co-ed, the fourth floor of the Hanover Inn Dartmouth was a single women’s dormitory. The Inn provided chaperones for the single female guests. In 1968, a west wing was added.

In December 2011, the Hanover Inn closed for a $43 million transformational renovation. First, the Inn completed 94 of the 108 guestrooms and opened a casual restaurant off the lobby, just in time for Dartmouth Commencement in June 2012. By August, in addition to a complete upgrade of guestrooms and amenities, the hotel added the Hayward Ballroom and several executive meeting rooms, the first step towards addressing a longstanding need for modern, on-campus conference facilities reflecting Dartmouth’s standing as a world-class educational and research institution. In November 2012, the complete 11,000 sq. ft. Minary Conference Center opened with a Grand Ballroom and a total of seven executive meeting rooms, in addition to the Hayward. PINE restaurant created by acclaimed chef/restaurateur Michael Schlow and led by Executive Chef Justin Dain opened in March 2013 and offers an approachable and imaginative menu showcasing New England-made food and drink. Today, the Hanover Inn Dartmouth is a AAA Four Diamond boutique hotel, with 108 guestrooms including fourteen suites in a classic neo-Georgian structure overlooking the Dartmouth Green. The Hanover Inn Dartmouth is owned by Dartmouth College and managed by Pyramid Hotel Group.

  • About the Architecture +

    Eleven years after Dartmouth was founded in 1769 via a charter granted by King George III, General Ebenezer Brewster arrived in Hanover to accept a position as the College steward. His home occupied the present site of the Inn. An enterprising Connecticut Yankee, General Brewster redesigned his home in 1780 and converted it into a tavern. One historian notes that his new enterprise was "not altogether, it would seem, to the gratification of the College authorities." However, business flourished, and in 1813, General Brewster's son, Amos, had the tavern moved to another site and initiated construction of a much larger building, which he accomplished by first inducing his father to take an extended trip. The larger structure became known as the Dartmouth Hotel, and it housed both permanent residents and transients. Professor Edwin J. Bartlett vividly recalled in a Dartmouth Book of Remembrance his two-year stay at a cost of six dollars per week, including meals: "One would almost conclude that it was planned, furnished, and managed to drive its guests to homes of their own." One old settler echoed the professor's opinion when, in 1887, the hotel burned to the ground, saying: "God finally visited his wrath upon this architectural conglomeration by burning it down." Two years later, the Wheelock Hotel was erected, and in 1901 the College began an extensive two-year reconstruction and remodeling of the facility. Upon its completion, the new building was named the Hanover Inn. Since that time, the history of the Inn has been one of continual growth and expansion. In 1924, an east wing was added, providing an additional 48 guestrooms for a total of 92. Exterior expansion, including an outdoor dining terrace and landscaping, was initiated in 1939. Before Dartmouth College became co-ed, the fourth floor of the Hanover Inn Dartmouth was a single women’s dormitory. The Inn provided chaperones for the single female guests. In 1968, a west wing was added. In December 2011, the Hanover Inn closed for a $43 million transformational renovation.


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Nobody Asked Me, But…


Hotel History: Hanover Inn Dartmouth (1780), Hanover, New Hampshire



By Stanley Turkel, CMHS



General Ebenezer Brewster whose home occupied the present site of the Hanover Inn, founded Brewster's Tavern in 1780. Around 1813, Brewster's son Amos replaced the tavern with a much larger building called the Dartmouth Hotel. That structure burned to the ground in 1887 and was replaced with a new building in 1889 which was called the Wheelock Hotel. From 1901 to 1903, Dartmouth College carried out extensive renovations to the facility which was named the Hanover Inn. An east wing was added in 1924 followed in 1939 by an exterior expansion. In 1968, a west wing was added to bring the total to 108 rooms. The neo-Georgian structure is owned by Dartmouth College and before it became co-ed, the fourth floor of the Hanover Inn was a women's dormitory with chaperones for single female guests.



More than two centuries after an inn was established at the southwest corner of the Dartmouth Green, The Hanover Inn at Dartmouth has undergone a modernization that successfully melds its historic roots with 21st century conveniences and amenities. The top-to-bottom enhancements include a new lobby with WiFi, a conference center befitting a prestigious educational institution, the largest ballroom in the Upper Valley, new guestrooms and suites, a health and fitness facility, and a signature restaurant overlooking the Dartmouth Green and Main Street.



The Inn's charm remains, with iconic local references woven throughout. A 2,800-pound, hand crafted "Concord Gray" granite table is the lobby's new centerpiece. It sits on a custom-designed black & white area rug whose colors were inspired by the birch trees so plentiful in the surrounding New Hampshire woods. A series of hand blown glass lamps from the renowned glass blower Simon Pearce of nearby Quechee, Vermont, illuminate the lobby under the new skylight.



These improvements were spearheaded by a team including Boston developer Richard Friedman (Class of '63) of Carpenter & Co, along with New York-based interior designer Bill Rooney, and architects, Cambridge 7 Associates of Boston, MA.



The Hanover Inn offers ample space for both corporate meetings and social events. The new Minary Conference Center, an 11,000 sq. ft. facility, includes a 4,000 sq. ft. grand ballroom, seven executive conference rooms, and the 1,761 sq. ft. Hayward Room overlooking the picturesque Dartmouth Green with its own granite fireplace and 103-inch plasma screen TV. Located at the corner of Main Street and Wheelock, the conference center is attached to the Hopkins Center for the Arts, adjacent to the Hood Museum of Art, and steps from the new Black Family Visual Arts Center.



Frommer's Review describes the Hanover Inn:



  • The white-and-brick Hanover Inn is the Upper Valley's best-managed and most up-to-date luxury hotel, perfectly situated for exploring both the Dartmouth campus and the compact downtown.... Established in 1780, most of the present-day five-story structure was actually added in successive stages—first in 1924, then again in 1939, and finally in 1968...Most of the rooms here have canopy or four-poster beds and down comforters; some even overlook the pretty green and the busy street. Dining options here include a fancy dining room, a terrace of outdoor tables fronting the green, and a wine bistro.

The Hanover Inn is a member of Historic Hotels of America and a Preferred Boutique destination.



*****



About Stanley Turkel, CMHS



Stanley Turkel is a recognized consultant in the hotel industry. He operates his hotel consulting practice serving as an expert witness in hotel-related cases and providing asset management an and hotel franchising consultation. Prior to forming his hotel consulting firm, Turkel was the Product Line Manager for worldwide Hotel/Motel Operations at the International Telephone & Telegraph Co. overseeing the Sheraton Corporation of America. Before joining IT&T, he was the Resident Manager of the Americana Hotel (1842 Rooms), General Manager of the Drake Hotel (680 Rooms) and General Manager of the Summit Hotel (762 Rooms), all in New York City. He serves as a Friend of the Tisch Center and lectures at the NYU Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism. He is certified as a Master Hotel Supplier Emeritus by the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association. He served for eleven years as Chairman of the Board of the Trustees of the City Club of New York and is now the Honorary Chairman.




Stanley Turkel is one of the most widely-published authors in the hospitality field. More than 275 articles on various hotel subjects have been posted in hotel magazines and on the Hotel-Online, Blue MauMau, Hotel News Resource and eTurboNews websites. Two of his hotel books have been promoted, distributed and sold by the American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute (Great American Hoteliers: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry and Built To Last: 100+ Year-Old Hotels East of the Mississippi). A third hotel book (Built To Last: 100+ Year-Old Hotels in New York) was called "passionate and informative" by the New York Times. Executive Vice President of Historic Hotels of America, Lawrence Horwitz, has even praised one book, Great American Hoteliers Volume 2: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry:



  • “If you have ever been in a hotel, as a guest, attended a conference, enjoyed a romantic dinner, celebrated a special occasion, or worked as a hotelier in the front or back of the house, Great American Hoteliers, Volume 2: Pioneers of the Hotel Industry is a must read book. This book is recommended for any business person, entrepreneur, student, or aspiring hotelier. This book is an excellent history book with insights into seventeen of the great innovators and visionaries of the hotel industry and their inspirational stories.”

Turkel was designated as the “2014 Historian of the Year by Historic Hotels of America,” the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. This award is presented to an individual for making a unique contribution in the research and presentation of history and whose work has encouraged a wide discussion, greater understanding and enthusiasm for American History.



Works published by Stanley Turkel include:



Most of these books can be ordered from AuthorHouse—(except Heroes of the American Reconstruction, which can be ordered from McFarland)—by visiting www.stanleyturkel.com, or by clicking on the book’s title.



Contact: Stanley Turkel



stanturkel@aol.com/917-628-8549

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