Union Station Hotel Nashville, Autograph Collection

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Discover Union Station Hotel Nashville, Autograph Collection, which was once a grand train hub where notorious gangster Al Capone once passed through.

Union Station Hotel Nashville, Autograph Collection was constructed at the dawn of the 20th century, in which the United States had started to emerge as a global superpower.

At the turn of the century, when rail travel was considered special, passengers dressed in their Sunday best, and train stations were built to be grand, beautiful buildings resembling something more along the lines of a modern day castle. Nashville's Union Station opened to the public on October 9, 1900. An architecturally marvelous Gothic-style, late Victorian Romanesque Revival style building, it featured lofty towers, turrets, and served as a testament to U.S. ingenuity and excitement for the new century.

During the glory days of rail travel in the U.S., the Nashville, Tennessee Union Station definitely saw its share of glamour. Movie starlet Mae West passed through, as well as notorious gangster Al Capone who was escorted through Nashville on his way to the Georgia penitentiary.

As rail travel fell out of fashion, the station was abandoned and fell into disrepair. Train service was finally discontinued in October 1979 and the station was completely abandoned. As the building was designated as a National Historic Lanmark in 1977, the fate of the building tugged on the heartstrings of Nashvillians who wanted to incorporate the preservation of the main terminal building in any plan for development. In the 1980s, a group of investors decided to play fairy godmother to the landmark building by investing in it and turning it into a luxury hotel. It passed in and out of the hands of various owners, and finally on October 9, 2007, it was re-dedicated after an $11 million restoration and renovation.

  • About the Architecture +
    Nashville's Union Station opened to the public on October 9, 1900. An architecturally marvelous Gothic-style, late Victorian Romanesque Revival style building, it featured lofty towers, turrets, and served as a testament to U.S. ingenuity and excitement for the new century.

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